Wayne State University

Aim Higher

Aging and Brain development

Title: Task-related modulation of hippocampal glutamate, subfield volumes, and associative memory in younger and older adults: A longitudinal ¹H fMRS study

PI Name: Dr. Naftali Raz,
Director of Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience
Institute of Gerontology
Wayne State University

PI Name: Dr. Jeffery Stanley,
Associate professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences
Wayne State University
Personal website: agingbrain.wayne.edu

In collaboration with Dr. Raz, we recently demonstrated the first in vivo evidence of continued myelination of white matter axons well into the 4th decade of adults by modeling the short spin-spin (T2) relaxation component from multi-echo T2 relaxation imaging. Results showed an inverted “U” trajectory in the myelin content of key white matter areas across the adult lifespan reflecting the continued myelination, but more importantly, demonstrates myelination during brain development. No otherin vivo neuroimaging techniques including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) or T1/T2 ratio imaging have been able to demonstrate these specific changes in myelin content with age. Also, we have demonstrated that the myelin imaging method is highly reliable and thus well-suited for longitudinal studies.

With Dr. Raz as the PI, we are investigating the relationship between age-related changes in the brain and cognition and to examine the mechanisms that may underlie these associations, specifically, changes in brain energy metabolism. We aim to establish whether the in healthy older adults, brain changes in volume, myelin content, iron deposition and energy metabolism are related to change in cognitive performance and whether changes in one domain (e.g., energy metabolism) drive changes in other aspects of brain health.

Publications:
  1. Arshad M*, Stanley JA, Raz N. Adult Age Differences in Subcortical Myelin Content Are Consistent with Protracted Myelination and Unrelated to Diffusion Tensor Imaging Indices. NeuroImage. 2016; 143: 26-39.
  2. Arshad M*, Stanley JA, Raz N. Test – Retest Reliability and Concurrent Validity of in vivo Myelin Content Indices: Myelin Water Fraction and Calibrated T1W/T2W Image Ratio. Human Brain Mapping. 2017; 38: 1780-17-90.
For further publications, see: scholar.google.com/citations?user=Q6WT00IAAAAJ&hl=en

Title:

PI Name: Dr. Jeffery Stanley,
Associate professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences
Wayne State University

Personal website: psychiatry.med.wayne.edu/research.php

In vivo ³¹P MRS is sensitive in detecting changes during development in the molecular biochemistry of cortex that reflects neuropil expansion/contraction by measuring precursors of membrane phospholipids (MPLs) [phosphocholine (PC); phoshoethanolamine (PE)]. In these publications, I was the first to report subcortical/cortical deficits in MPL precursor levels of ADHD children that are suggestive of an alteration of an earlier developing region potentially influencing the maturational integration of later developing regions.

Publications Dr. Jeffery Stanley:
  1. Stanley JA, Wu H, Goradia DD, Khatib D, Rajan U, Burgess A, Robin AL, Rosenberg DR. Evidence of Altered Neuropil Development in ADHD children: A Longitudinal in vivo ³¹P MRS Study at 3 Tesla. Biological Psychiatry. May 2015; 77: S-108S.
  2. Stanley JA, Kipp H, Greisenegger E, Macmaster FP, Panchalingam K, Keshavan MS, Bukstein OG and Pettegrew JW. Evidence of Developmental Alterations in Cortical and Subcortical Regions of Children with ADHD: A Multi-voxel In Vivo 31P Spectroscopy Study. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry, 2008, 65:1419-28.
  3. Stanley JA, Kipp H, Greisenegger K, Panchalingam K, Pettegrew JW, Keshavan MS, Bukstein OG. Regionally specific alterations in membrane phospholipids in children with ADHD: an in vivo31P spectroscopy study. Psychiatry Research 2006; 148:217-221

Title:

PI Name: Dr. Noa Ofen
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology
Wayne State University
Personal website: ofenlab.wayne.edu

Dr. Ofen is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at WSU and faculty member of the Life-Span Cognitive Neuroscience Program at the Institute of Gerontology at WSU. Dr. Ofen's group investigates the development of cognition and how cognitive development relates to the developing brain. Dr. Ofen is the PI of an NIH award “Development of Memory Networks in Children” (R01 MH107512, Dates: 2016-2021). This funded project and other research activities are aimed to collect structural and functional neuroimaging data that can be used to identify memory-related cortical activations and to correlate variability in the brain measures with that in cognitive functioning as the brain develops from childhood to adulthood.